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Database Administration & Monitoring

Oracle Team

You are in Standard Edition, when to worry?

By | Database Administration & Monitoring, Oracle | 4 Comments

By Franck Pachot . A previous blog post explaining what happens for those in ‘Standard Edition One’ had a “don’t worry” in the title because you can upgrade to SE2 with minimal additional cost – except when you have to buy new NUPs – and get only small additional limitation. I didn’t made such a post for people in Standard Edition but there is a case where it can be worrying because of the 2…

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Stéphane Savorgnano

SQL Server 2016: New possibilities for Index Maintenance Task

By | Database Administration & Monitoring | No Comments

The new CTP 2.4 has been released some weeks ago by Microsoft. My colleagues and I have already blogged about some new functionalities. I will focus in this blog about the new possibility of Index Maintenance Tasks regarding Indexes. Until SQL Server 2016, DBAs didn’t use often the Maintenance Plan provided by SQL Server for indexes. In fact, those two tasks, Reorganize Index and Rebuild Index were not enough detailed and DBA’s preferred to create…

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Pierre Sicot

dbsnmp expiring password, manually triggering metrics collections

By | Database Administration & Monitoring | No Comments

When you use Enterprise Manager Cloud control 12c, the monitor username commonly used is dbsnmp. Depending on the Oracle profile used for this user, the dbsnmp password can expire, and as a consequence multiple targets will be seen in a pending status by Enterprise Manager Cloud control 12c. An interesting way to solve this problem is to create a metric extension detecting in how many days the password will expire: You realize the operation as…

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Olivier Toussaint

How to migrate your tablespace from 11g to a PDB in the Cloud

By | Database Administration & Monitoring | No Comments

Goal We will take a tablespace named FOR TRAVEL for migrate it into a PDB situated in your Europe Cloud in extreme performance database. This migration will be executed with Data Pump and transportable tablespace method. We will migrate the tablespace “FOR_TRAVEL” with a table  from Windows Oracle 11g database to Linux  Oracle 12c PDB Database. On-Premise Database You must have : A directory and permissions : Operactions Let’s take our BACKUP_DIR directory for the…

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Stéphane Haby

How to be sure that tempdb size is good to run a DBCC CHECKDB?

By | Database Administration & Monitoring, Database management | No Comments

In many blogs or forums, you can read that the answer is to use the option: WITH ESTIMATEONLY. With this option, you can easily have the space estimation needed to check the database in tempdb. But be careful, only since SQL Server 2014, this estimation has been good! See the PS from Paul Randal’s blog for this information, here But between SQL server 2008, 2012 and 2014…and 2016, the result of this query changed! 😕

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Oracle Team

Mapping In-memory Column Store to datafile Row Store extents

By | Database Administration & Monitoring, Oracle | No Comments

By Franck Pachot . Oracle In-Memory is an hybrid solution: an In-Memory Column Store in addition to the traditional Row Store. In the IMCS, data is stored in IMCU (In-memory compression units) and metadata is in SMU (Snapshot Metadata Units) In the row store, data is stored in datafile extents and metadata is stored in the dictionary (and in datafile header since Locally managed Tablespaces). Let’s see how they map to eachothers.

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Oracle Team

In-memory trickle repopulation

By | Database Administration & Monitoring, Oracle | No Comments

By Franck Pachot . In the ‘traditional’ row store, the indexes are maintained at the same time as rows are changed. It’s different with the In-memory Column Store. Changes are maintained by background processes. When rows are changed, the Snapshot Metadata Units (SMU) logs the changes and In-Memory Compression Units (IMCU) are re-populated asynchronously. Let’s see an example.

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